What does recovery look like?

So many people view recovery as complete abstinence from whatever it is (too many things to list) for life. Although for now that is how it is for me, I need the complete abstinence for else I’ll mess up, I believe it doesn’t have to be that way. I believe recovery means that it’s no longer a part of your life. That it’s a non issue.

What do you think?

Thank you S.S for writing and sharing this. I really appreciate it! For proving that it can be done.

Recovery IS possible.

So long as there’s life, there’s hope.

Succulent Savage Says...

This post is for Eliza following her request earlier today. Check out her blog https://elizajourneythroughlife.home.blog/.

I’ve written a number of posts about living with and overcoming from an eating disorder. Today I want to talk about living in recovery. I’ve been recovered for about 10 years now. It’s different in so many ways. One of them is having the ability to actively choose to self-soothe with food without going in a full relapse.

Shortly after my mother died I had a stressful day that pushed me to my emotional limits. Grief, stress, and worry weighed on me. One of those days where everything goes wrong and nothing helps relieve it. I’d used every coping skill in my arsenal. I thought about how much I just wanted a piece of cake. I went through the mental gymnastics of how it wouldn’t really make it better and all the reasons why…

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51 thoughts on “Can one recover from an Eating Disorder

    1. Anyone can relapse. What I mean is that I view recognise as something where whatever was there is no longer an issue.
      What do you think?
      💕💕💕

      Like

      1. This is just my opinion… it depends on the severity of it all. For me, I have never had a chance to relapse in mental health recovery, because there has never been a remission of symptoms. But, for other recovery-based phenomena, where there is remission of a condition, you can never be too sure that a relapse won’t happen. Thus, it is so important to stay on top of things, knowing that you can relapse at anytime. But, also that you can get back on track at anytime as well! Having self-compassion or “grace” with one’s self is so very important in anything recovery-based. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Thanks for sharing! I really appreciate it… The self compassion is so important. It takes away the guilt when you mess up. Yup, I was referring to such things (like ED, self harm, addictions which really are all the same). The guilt and hatred just makes it worse.
          💕💕💕

          Like

    1. Thanks for sharing
      I know you feel that way 🙂 I just hope that eventually that doesn’t have to be my life (for now it still is).
      Love, light and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Well, if you figure out how to make drinking work, do me a favor and let me know! I got some GETTIN’ HAMMERED to do!!!

        And therein, Eliza, lies the rub. There’s no way to fix that.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Haha this made me laugh. But yeah, I don’t drink but if I did that’s what I’d want to be able to do. To have a cup of wine with friends without all the thoughts and feelings. Where it’s enough and no longer an addiction or path to spiral down. I know I haven’t gotten anywhere near there but it’s what I really want.

          Liked by 1 person

  1. Have you ever heard of the blog beautybeyondbones? A wonderful girl runs it who recovered from an eating disorder, and her story and insights are beautiful. You may like it ❤ I definitely think it's possible ❤
    power to the local dreamer ||-//

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m great! Gotten used to lockdown- found things to do. I’m reading, coloring, learning. Even baking and cooking! Life seems pretty good. How about you??

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Cool! Learning new things too here like running and enjoying the family time. I enjoy baking sometimes. Soon you’ll be awesome!
          Love light and glitter

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Wonderful! I’m happy that you’re learning new stuff! Thank you- I hope I’ll be good too. Made fudgy brownies with buttercream frosting today, hopefully they’ll turn out good. Stay safe!!

            Liked by 1 person

                    1. Okay I don’t know if you’re sleeping or awake. I was going to write a post for you. Then when you said this I was going to email you but you don’t have email info on your blog. Then I thought of writing a post to someone special without saying who, I wrote it but can’t publish it, in case you don’t want. I’m not sure if you’d appreciate it or not (you can still let me know). Tonight and tomorrow is shabbat for me.
                      Thinking of you. Will be thinking of you. You are special and shine so brightly.
                      💕💕💕

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. Awwww, thank you! You’re the sweetest. You can do whatever you’d want to- just please, please don’t keep my name there 🙂
                      Thank you for thinking of me- it really warmed my heart!! You’ve made my day- I was having a crappy one, so a huge HUGE thank you for making me so happy!
                      💓💓💓
                      Stay safe. Sending love…

                      Liked by 1 person

    1. Fifth ad infinitum. If there weren’t I wouldn’t be here today (and I’m messing with food now so if there weren’t I don’t have a chance. Not that it would be so bad if I didn’t have another chance).
      Love, light and glitter

      Like

  2. An excellent thought to ponder. I’ll check out the other post in a moment. I just wanted to say that there are success stories of people who have ‘recovered’ as though it’s a destination, though I don’t know what proportion of ED sufferers that accounts for (my guess would be a minority). For some it’s a continual work in progress. Others, like me to an extent, likely can ‘recover’ from many of the behaviours, but the thoughts can linger as though imprinted indelibly on their brains and their way of life. Oddly enough, ‘recovery’ for me started when I accepted an eating disorder and thought ‘I’ll live with this forever’, I guess it took a lot of pressure off me by viewing it that way. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for sharing Caz.
      For me I think I lived without the mindset for a few months. You know how 3 months feels like forever at the time? So I believe it must one day be possible. I want to be able to use painkillers normally one day, too. And just be ‘normal. Not about the normality but just living. As long as the thoughts are ever there it’s harder.
      💕💕💕💕💕💕

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Recovery is definitely possible. What I learned working in the addiction field is that it takes a lot of work. Some people have to work at it their whole lives, but if they do, the work gets easier and the disease is not so much a part of everyday life. Healthy living becomes a habit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for sharing! I hope it’s not a life work, that sounds way too endless. Though then again it’s about the journey not the destination. Sometimes I pretend to have wisdom.
      Love, light and glitter

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I get glimpses of wisdom now and then. I really do believe recovery from anything gets easier as it becomes a way of life. One day at a time might be a cliche, but it’s a useful one.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I sometimes live by one day at a time. Not now that I’m messing up. But it’s not just a cliche, it is, but it’s truth. The present is all we have…

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Yes, recovery is possible, but tough – you see everyone around you eating normally and not experiencing the angst with each morsel of food that is eaten. Sadly, people don’t see the starvation and purging as anything more than a way to stay skinny, while they are harming their bodies by losing valuable nutrients, weakening their bones, muscles, immune systems and even destroying their tooth enamel – maybe even losing their life. You are likely too young to remember the singer Karen Carpenter, who suffered from anorexia nervosa for many years and hid it from fans. After she died, there were many stories written about her and because I liked her voice, probably the most mellow female voice I’ve heard, I read many of those articles.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Her and her brother, Richard, were “The Carpenters” and they had a lot of hits after their first hit “Close to You” – her voice was just smooth as silk. They did some nice Christmas music and every song/album went to number 1 shortly after hitting the charts. It was a different era for music. Speaking of getting skinny, I saw Adele’s picture today – she was trending on Twitter. She lost 100 pounds. This is the “Close to You” song which came out 50 years ago (that makes me feel old):

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Video unavailable. I’ll have to Google it… you’re not old! My parents aren’t old! But yeah, I know what you mean even if I’m a third of your age, or almost.

          Liked by 1 person

              1. That’s great Eliza – I see you followed me too – I hate to tell you but I don’t post there as a have no smartphone but just went on for Mike Posner, the musician who walked across the U.S. and for “This Girl is a Squirrel.” I am more active on Twitter than on Facebook where I post nothing at all, but do comment on others’ posts.

                Liked by 1 person

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